A to Z of Photography: Tilt-Shift and Train Wreck at Montparnasse – Photography Article

This week we turn to a train wreck of an image — yes the iconic photo “Train Wreck at Montparnasse Station”! But before we get to that, step back to the dawn of photography and understand the principles behind tilting and shifting the lens relative to the sensor. Some of the highest profile photographers use tilt-shift lenses in their day-to-day work, so find out why that is. Tilt-Shift Photography Is there something so inherent to the design of the camera,…

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A to Z of Photography: Shooting Sex and Strip Photography – Photography Article

Sex and stripping seem to go hand in hand, but in this edition of the A to Z of photography, I cover the acclaimed work of fashion photographer Bob Carlos Clark, “Shooting Sex” and then delve into the technical details of the photo finish. Shooting Sex Shooting Sex is the eponymous semi-autobiographical work of Bob Carlos Clarke (also this link). With 176 13×11″ glossy pages, this weighty hardcover tome is about how to shoot on the theme of sex rather than…

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A to Z of Photography: Reflex Camera and Tony Ray-Jones – Photography Article

At pretty much three-quarters of the way through the alphabet we stop at R, an eminently popular letter, to look at the foundation of pretty much all contemporary cameras — the Reflex. This is followed by the inspiringly funny work of Tony Ray-Jones whose career was cruelly cut short. Reflex Camera The Reflex Camera is at first an odd name as, unless you an English graduate, it sounds like a knee-jerk response to being hit! However reflex also means to…

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Photoflash Bombs Were Once Used to Light Nighttime Aerial Photos – Photography Article

Digital cameras can see in color in near darkness these days, but decades ago, there were very different solutions for capturing usable photos at night. One example is the photoflash bomb, a special type of bomb that was designed specifically to explode in midair and illuminate the world below for aerial photos. The photoflash bomb was commonly used by military spy planes to capture images of the ground at night from higher (and safer) altitudes. From the outside, they looked…

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A to Z of Photography: Wayne Quilliam and the Queen – Photography Article

In this issue of the A to Z of Photography we turn to possibly the thorniest letter of the alphabet: Q. Fear not as we take you on a journey from an interview with the antipodean photographer Wayne Quilliam, through Elvis, Brahmanandam Kanneganti, Kim Kardashian, Princess Diana, and Donald Trump before finally arriving at the Queen. Wayne Quilliam Wayne Quilliam is a bit of polymath when it comes to photography, undertaking events, drone imaging, documentary, landscapes, videography, and contemporary art…

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Here’s What Photoshop Was Like in 1988 – Photography Article

You might not realize it, but Photoshop has entered its fourth decade of existence, and in those many years, it has had a lot of time to evolve into the highly intricate and powerful application it is today. Ever wonder what it was like to use in its early days? Check out this awesome video that shows what it was like working with a version released in 1988. Coming to you from Computer Clan, this fun video looks at Photoshop version…

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A to Z of Photography: Panoramic Photography and the Pillars of Creation – Photography Article

With this installment we revisit the whole sub-genre of panoramic photography. Literally(!) a wide subject, discover the history behind it, the software to create it, and the competitions to enter. Once you’ve scrambled your way through the panoramas, discover one of the most beautiful photos in the universe. Read on. Panoramic Photography Standing on the promontory, you gaze in awe at the vista before you, a huge expanse of space that seemingly sucks you in to a void, drawing you…

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How Does Climate Change Art? – Photography Article

You might think that when a piece of art is finished, it is done in every sense of the word, now a static object — unchanging, permanent forever. But it’s anything but; in fact, all art is fleeting when you place it on the timescales our planet runs on. Just how do climate and art interact? What can art tell us about climate, particularly as it continues to be at the forefront of discussions of the future of humanity? Coming…

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Now, Where Did I Put That? Famous Lost and Left Behind Cameras and Film – Photography Article

Have you ever run out to a shoot and realized that despite your best laid plans, you left something behind? Packed up, boarded a plane, and realized you left your memory cards or film at home? How far back did you have to go to get it? Imagine realizing that you had to travel 238,900 miles? Or worse, 170 years into the past. The Moon Many camera aficionados know that there is a treasure trove of Hasselblads on the moon. In an…

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One of the Most Iconic Kissing Photos Was Staged – Photography Article

What’s up, photography fans? It’s Martin here from All About Street Photography, and today I want to talk about the story behind the famous photo Le baiser de l’hôtel de ville (Kiss by the Town Hall) by French photographer Robert Doisneau. If you are not familiar with Doisneau, here’s a video I made about his life and work: People like my photos because they see in them what they would see if they stopped rushing about, and took the time…

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New Exhibition Shows How a Look at the Dark Side Can Show a Photographer the Light – Photography Article

An amazing new exhibition has just opened, depicting images once lost to history and giving us a behind the scenes glimpse at some of the greatest mysteries of our time. I love history. As the saying goes: the past may not repeat itself, but it sure does rhyme. And there are few better ways to understand the current world we live in than to look into our past to recognize similar patterns to the waves we currently find ourselves riding. I am also a…

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A to Z of Photography: Noise and Helmut Newton – Photography Article

Moving on to N, we enter the second half of the alphabet and with that a headlong rush to Z. It’s been a blast getting to this point, but now we start the countdown. In this issue the A to Z of Photography we visit that most unwanted of digital acquaintances, noise, before taking a peek at the cover work (and Polaroids) of Helmut Newton. (Image) Noise A digital sensor reduces to a device that counts the number of photons…

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Watching ‘Chernobyl’: How Important Are Visuals for Understanding History? – Photography Article

When we think of history and how dry it may appear as a subject to some, what role do visuals play in increasing genuine interest and cultivating understanding of things that have happened? I myself have always had a strong interest in history, and as such, never truly considered the importance visuals may play in generating interest for those who may find it an uninteresting subject in general, until I came across the new historical HBO TV mini series “Chernobyl” (2019), which…

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A to Z of Photography: Inge Morath and Minolta – Photography Article

With M we reach a significant milestone in the A to Z of Photography as this is the halfway mark. So far “Bronica and Burtynsky” and “Fujifilm” have been the most read with the “Family of Man” and “Image Stabilization and Into the Jaws of Death” languishing at the bottom of the popularity charts! Onwards then to Inge Morath and Minolta. Inge Morath Inge Morath was born in 1923 to Austrian parents who, as scientists, worked in various laboratories across…

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A to Z of Photography: Lenna and Leica – Photography Article

This week we move on to L in the A to Z of Photography and an image of Lenna that has impacted every photographer, along with the little red dot… yes, this article gives a brief overview of the history of Leica, a brand that has influenced everyone directly or indirectly through either their design or the photos shot with them. Lenna Lena Söderberg, pronounced Lenna, is a Swedish model born in 1951 whose claim to fame is being the…

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LAPD Crime Scene Photos from the Mid-1900s – Photography Article

A new exhibition in Los Angeles will feature crime scene photos captured by police officers in the Los Angeles Police Department from between 1925 and the 1970s. Back in 2001, Fototeka founder Merrick Morton, who’s also a photographer and LAPD reserve officer, received unprecedented access to Los Angeles’ records department and its immense photo archive. At the City Records Center in downtown Los Angeles, which houses 150 years worth of city documents in 47,500 square feet of cardboard crates, Morton…

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Photographing Heritage Railroads | Fstoppers – Photography Article

Trains, trains, trains. Heritage Railroads offer a lot of fun and a great photographic subject for those who like to travel. In this article I share my methods of capturing these magnificent vintage iron horses. As an adolescent, I became enthralled with model railroads. My father and I constructed an HO gauge railroad in our basement, complete with models of buildings, lichen trees, and gravel based railroad tracks. I spent hours creating small balsa wood structures from hobby kits. We…

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Nikon’s D1 Changed Photography 20 Years Ago – Photography Article

With all of the noise about new mirrorless cameras and all the benefits they bring to the digital photography table, it’s time to take a moment to recognize a pioneer whose 20th birthday just quietly passed: the Nikon D1. The Nikon D1 was announced in June 1999, and while its specs sound underwhelming today (a 2.74 MP APS-C CCD sensor and a maximum ISO of 1,600 that you probably wouldn’t want to go near at all), at the time, it…

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Cinematographer Dicusses His Work on The Empire Strikes Back – Photography Article

Ever wondered how the filmmakers of probably the best-looking Star Wars movie managed to light Darth Vader’s blacker than black costume without seeing the light fixtures in the helmet? The answer to this and a few more nuggets of film history and cinematography tricks are revealed in this short but fascinating interview. Black is one of the most problematic colors to photograph. Not only does it absorb the most amount of light that is thrown at it — often requiring extra or more expensive light sources —…

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A to Z of Photography: JPEG and William Jackson – Photography Article

J takes us back to the very foundations of digital photography with none other than the, love-it or loathe-it, JPEG file format. If that seems like old hat, then step back another century to the iconic work of William Henry Jackson who produced some of the first photos of Yellowstone National Park. JPEG JPEG is an acronym for the Joint Photographic Experts Group, which is actually a sub-group of the ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1, Subcommittee 29, Working Group 1,…

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Read Hasselblad’s Moon Landing Press Release from 1969 – Photography Article

This month, Hasselblad is celebrating the 50th anniversary of becoming “the first camera on the moon.” And in addition to sharing some beautiful photos taken of and with the iconic Hasselblad Data Camera (HDC) and Hasselblad Electric Camera (HEC) used on the moon, they also shared a bit of fascinating history: their original moon landing press release from 1969. As the original press release explains, the official anniversary of Hasselblad (and man’s) first trip to the lunar surface will happen…

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The Photos That Helped Bring an End to Child Labor – Photography Article

At the turn of the 20th century, the Industrial Revolution had led to a need for workers, and in the pursuit of cheap labor that was less likely to unionize, many companies turned to hiring children, often putting them in dangerous conditions for long hours and low pay. As the cries for child labor reform began to grow, one man’s photos helped to humanize the movement and spur the change. This great video tells the story of his work. Coming…

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These Photos Ended Child Labor in the US – Photography Article

Photographs have the power to bring issues to the forefront of public consciousness and spark change in society. Here’s a 6.5-minute video by Vox that tells the story of how photographer Lewis Wickes Hine helped end child labor in the United States. In the year 1900, the US Federal Census revealed that there were 1.75 million children younger than 16 that were employed and working jobs across the country in places such as farms, mills, factories, and mines. The non-profit…

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Will Photography Follow the Trajectory of Art From Realism to Abstract? – Photography Article

Art mimicked life and photography captured it. Then photography mimicked art until it too became an art form. But will it follow the trajectory of paint and canvas trends?In 2019, photography feels old. It’s ubiquitous in modern society with the ability to enjoy and create photographs now often predating speech in children. But really, it’s a modern invention that is still going through its early motions. Is it possible that we’re likely to see photography follow the drastically shifting trends…

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A to Z of Photography: Image Stabilization and Into the Jaws of Death – Photography Article

This installment of the A to Z of photography begins with perhaps the most exciting photographic technology of the 21st century — image stabilization. This is followed by one of the most iconic photos of the 20th century — Into the Jaws of Death — which marks a tipping point in history. The I’s have it! Image Stabilization Image stabilization (IS) is one of those technologies that works tirelessly behind the scenes, operating at the lowest hardware level of the…

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Humble Cameras in Iconic Moments – Photography Article

Photojournalism helps to shape our collective consciousness. In thinking about how important photojournalism is, I’ve often found myself considering what happens when amateurs with amateur equipment find themselves in extraordinary circumstances.   WARNING: GRAPHIC NEWS EVENTS DEPICTED BELOW Susan Sontag said: . . . photography is the only major art in which professional training and years of experience do not confer insuperable advantage over the untrained and inexperienced –for many reasons, among them the large role that chance (or luck) plays…

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A to Z of Photography: Hyper-lapse and Horst P. Horst – Photography Article

From contemporary to classic in one breath, in this installment of the A to Z of Photography I outline the current, and oh so trendy, hyper-lapse technique before showcasing the work of the classic, and brilliant, photography of Horst P. Horst, including his signature work the “Mainbocher Corset”. Read on for more! Hyper-lapse As photographers we deal in exposure and in so doing have the ability to manipulate aperture and shutter speed. Exposure is of course only part of the…

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A to Z of Photography: Nan Goldin and the Golden Triangle – Photography Article

After a monster week of F, it’s time to get back to some semblance of normality (although the title sounds like a Harry Potter novel!). Coming at you straight from Photography 101 and the chapter on “Composition” is the Golden Triangle, followed from left-field by Nan Goldin. Nan Goldin Nan Goldin is most closely associated with the LGBT community in the US with her most notable, and breakthrough, work being “The Ballad of Sexual Dependency”. Born to middle-class Jewish parents, the…

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Discovering Century-Old Dry Plate Photos – Photography Article

In my work travels, I recently met someone who gave me an interesting gift. Several years back he had been driving down a back road in Virginia and came across an old, abandoned farmhouse. He stopped and peeked in to see if anyone was using the place (you can’t be too careful about what you run across that looks abandoned these days), and saw only cobwebs. He went in and found an interesting box by Seed’s Dry Plates. The company…

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A to Z of Photography: Family of Man (Part 2) – Photography Article

The Family of Man is the second of our two monumental Fs in the A to Z of Photography. Can it usurp the 77,000 strong workforce and $22 billion turnover of Fujifilm in the last post? Surely there is nothing more all encompassing than humankind. The Exhibition The Family of Man (FoM) was an ambitious photographic exhibition envisaged and curated by Edward Steichen, Director of the New York Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) Department of Photography. Photography exhibitions weren’t new,…

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